How To Make Beef Jerky With A Dehydrator - Toast Net

Beef jerky is one of the most common and tasty snacks on the planet. It's easy to prepare and store, it travels well, and you can take it practically anywhere.

If you are curious about how this works or want specific details about how to dehydrate beef, read through some of these tips for making beef jerky with a dehydrator.

Dehydrating beef jerky is a fantastically flavorful way to make this much-loved meat into a convenient, portable snack. It can also be dried in the oven if you don't have a dehydrator.

If you're a beef jerky lover but tired of the same flavors or want to satisfy other, more adventurous tastes without completely emasculating your taste buds, here are some beefy, savory flavor combinations that'll get you drooling.

Making beef jerky with a dehydrator is an easy DIY project! This article will demonstrate how to make beef jerky with a dehydrator. 

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How to make beef jerky with a dehydrator

Beef jerky is one of the most common and tasty snacks on the planet. It's easy to prepare and store, it travels well, and you can take it practically anywhere. If you are curious about how this works or want specific details about how to dehydrate beef, read through some of these tips for making beef jerky with a dehydrator.

Dehydrating beef jerky is a fantastically flavorful way to make this much-loved meat into a convenient, portable snack. It can also be dried in the oven if you don't have a dehydrator. If you're a beef jerky lover but tired of the same flavors or want to satisfy other, more adventurous tastes without completely emasculating your taste buds, here are some beefy, savory flavor combinations that'll get you drooling. Making beef jerky with a dehydrator is an easy DIY project! This article will demonstrate to make beef jerky with a dehydrator.

Step 1: Preparing your meat

  • Different cuts of beef work well for making jerky. Your best choices are flank steak, the fattier part of the brisket, and London broil.
  • If you plan to purchase from a butcher, tell him specifically that you want meat for making jerky. If you want to be sure that your meat is high quality, insist on grade A or USDA-approved cuts. This will ensure that the meat you're using isn't full of fats and hormones.
  • If you buy meat from a butcher, it's best to use it as soon as possible. If you must store it for any length of time, freeze it in your freezer until you're ready to use it.
  • You should never use beef that's been previously frozen or brought into cold environments. Beef that has been frozen is particularly susceptible to spoilage because the meat is less able to contain bacteria without damage to the proteins and fats.
  • When you're making jerky, remember that leaner cuts are better for jerky production than fattier cuts. The leaner the cut of meat, the less moisture there will be in the final product. You will want to use the leanest cuts of beef possible.
  • If you're not sure whether you should go for the leaner or fattier cuts of meat, err on the side of the fattier. The fattier cuts have more fat and connective tissues, which will make it easier to dry them out.

Step 2: Dehydrating

  • The idea behind dehydrating is that you are removing moisture from your food without damaging the structural integrity of cells. This intact cell structure makes jerky much harder to chew and digest than other dried foods. Getting rid of some moisture also allows jerky to be stored more easily because it won't attract water as readily as other foods will.
  • When you're making beef jerky, using a dehydrator will give you the best results. If you have a food dehydrator, dry your meat for about 12 hours to get the best results. The optimal temp for drying your beef jerky is between 145 and 160 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • If you don't have a food dehydrator, don't worry! You can still make great jerky with a standard oven. Set the oven to its lowest temperature and leave it on overnight. Try drying the meat in the oven until it cracks but doesn't break when bent.

Step 3: Setting up your dehydrator

  • It's easiest to make jerky with a food dehydrator. You can find them in supermarkets and hardware stores. The ones that run on electricity are probably the best options, though you might be able to find a model that runs on propane too.
  • You can also make great jerky without a dehydrator! Check out some of these tips for making beef jerky without a dehydrator.

Step 4: Choosing your spices 

  • If you want to make beef jerky with any sort of spice, you'll need to locate the spices before making the meat. The spices should also keep well in an airtight container until you're ready to use them. Certain spices that you can put on jerky include curry, cinnamon, and cayenne pepper. If you want something a little milder, you should use garlic powder and onion powder.
  • Your choice of spices is basically up to your own taste preferences. You can also look online for more ideas if you're not sure what to choose.
  • Beef jerky is tasty no matter what seasonings are used, but don't go overboard! Be careful not to make your meat too spicy or it will overwhelm your taste buds with strong flavors.

Step 5: Getting the best result

  • If you're going to use a dehydrator, follow its instructions carefully when putting the beef into it.
  • If you're going to put your jerky in the oven, try to keep the temperature as low as possible. You don't want your jerky to be too dry either! A low temperature will allow you to get more moisture out of the meat than a higher temperature will.
  • Don't forget that each piece of jerky is going to be different! Your beef may be slightly larger or smaller than the one shown below. This is normal and it doesn't affect your results.
  • When you're done drying, pack up all of your beef into airtight containers, including any spices and marinade that you used. You can store them in the fridge or freezer until you're ready to use them.

Tips to make beef jerky with a dehydrator

  • Dehydrated beef jerky can be a bit more tricky to make than the jerky made in the oven. Here are a few tips you should keep in mind when making beef jerky with a dehydrator:
  • The meat needs to be completely dry For best results, let it sit at room temperature for at least 8 hours before dehydrating It's important that you dry it completely before putting it in the oven Make sure your dehydrator has a temperature control setting If you're using an electric dehydrator, make sure that you don't have too many trays lined up on top of each other This could cause too much moisture buildup, which will ruin your jerky and make it taste bad.
  • Dehydrators are great tools to make beef jerky, but they take a while to make. You need to be patient with your dehydration process. If you're in a hurry, you're better off using the oven instead.
  • Dehydrated beef jerky can last up to 6 months. It's important that you store it in an airtight container and make sure that you don't expose it to any moisture or else your beef jerky could get moldy.
  • If you're worried about the quality of your dehydrated jerky, warm it up for a few seconds in the microwave before eating it. This should kill any bacteria or mold spores that may be growing on or inside of your meat.
  • Dehydration melts the fat away from your meat and leaves it with a very tough texture. If you make beef jerky with a dehydrator, expect your meat to feel much harder (and chewier) than normal beef jerky made in the oven.

How to store homemade beef jerky

  • If you're careful to use high-quality beef and follow the steps below, homemade beef jerky will stay good for at least one year. If you're not sure whether your meat is still fresh, look at the sell-by date on the packaging. The sell-by date presumes that the meat is fresh and ready for use. If it has passed its sell-by date, you should throw it away.
  • You can also avoid this problem with a few extra precautions that can help keep your jerky from degrading in quality over time. Here are some tips for how to store homemade beef jerky:
  • Wrap any leftovers in cling wrap or foil and store them in a freezer-safe container.
  • As soon as you bring your beef home, separate it into individual servings. This makes it easy to thaw out exactly how much jerky you want without having to thaw the entire package.
  • Trim off any fat before putting your meat into the fridge or freezer. You don't want your jerky to get too soft or else it will be harder to chew.
  • Prevent any moisture from getting in contact with your jerky. Even a little bit of moisture can make the outside of your jerky moldy and soggy while leaving the inside dry and crumbly.
  • Remove any air from your storage container before you seal it up. If you can, try to vacuum seal the container instead of simply covering it with cling wrap or foil.
  • If you have any leftover jerky after a year or so, you can either re-freeze it or cut it into manageable-sized pieces and store them in the fridge.

How to store beef or pork jerky in the fridge.

  • You can keep beef jerky in the fridge for about two weeks. You may want to eat it within a few days of making it, but if you're storing it in the fridge to use later, you can store your homemade beef jerky for several weeks as long as you take these steps:
  • Wrap your meat in moisture-absorbing paper or aluminum foil and store it loosely in a freezer-safe container.
  • Mix the beef with a bit of salt, sugar, or extra seasoning to help it stay good longer.
  • Leave your jerky at room temperature for a few hours to dry it out a little. This drying won't be enough to ruin the flavor of your meat, but it will make it last longer in the fridge.
  • Let your jerky come to room temperature before you eat it or else you could spoil your appetite with cold jerky!
  • If you want to keep beef jerky in the fridge for even longer, freeze it instead. You can freeze a whole package at once, or divide them into single servings if you don't want to use them all at once. You can also increase the shelf life of your beef jerky by using a vacuum sealer on the individual pieces.
  • You might want to store beef jerky this way if you're expecting guests, and you don't want to run out before they get here.

FAQs

Do you cook beef jerky before dehydrating it?

You don't need to cook your meat before you dehydrate it. Just make sure your meat is completely dry before you put it into the oven or dehydrator. How long does beef jerky need to dehydrate?

Beef jerky can be dehydrated for 1-12 hours. The time depends on a few factors, such as the size and thickness of your pieces of jerky, how moist the meat is, and how much air the oven or dehydrator contains (ideally none). How long can I keep my beef jerky underwater?

If you're using a dry food storage container, then definitely not for more than 24 hours. You need to keep your jerky in the fridge or freezer after you bring it home or else it will go bad. 

Is it safe to make beef jerky in a dehydrator?

You can dehydrate beef jerky in a dehydrator, but it takes a bit longer and results in a tougher jerky. While you can make beef jerky using the oven if you really want to, it's better to use the dehydrator. 

What setting do you use for beef jerky in a dehydrator?

You should set your dehydrator to about 140 degrees F. This will take about 10-14 hours for most types of jerky. 

Do you have to flip beef jerky in a dehydrator?

You can flip your jerky during the dehydrating process, but it's not necessary. If you do flip it, just make sure you don't run into any problems with sticking to the racks. It doesn't matter which side ends up facing upwards when you finish dehydrating it because both sides will finish cooking at the same time. 

How long does jerky take in a dehydrator?

You can expect your beef jerky to take anywhere from 10-14 hours to dehydrate in the oven. If you're using a dehydrator, it will only take an hour or two depending on the temperature setting you select. 

What's the best meat to dehydrate for jerky?

You can dehydrate any kind of meat for jerky, but the best results will come from cuts of meat with a bit of fat on them. Lean cuts can also be good, but you might need to marinate them first. 

Conclusion

Making beef jerky is a lot easier than you might think. It doesn't even require any complicated equipment. All you need is some meat, your oven or dehydrator, and some time.

Whether you're dehydrating beef in an oven or a dehydrator, the process is similar.

Homemade beef jerky can be as easy to make as it is to eat. In fact, you can make some of your own jerkies at home within about a week. As long as you take the time to follow the instructions and keep an eye out for any potential problems, you shouldn't meet any major setbacks along the way.

Making homemade beef jerky is a great way to use up surplus meat from your freezer or meat in your home. If you need more information on how to make beef jerky with a dehydrator, let's comment down below. Since it's a fun and simple project, everyone will be eager to try your homemade beef jerky!

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